Model UN Travels to John Hopkins University

Screen Shot 2017-02-23 at 9.24.00 AM.png

Photo courtesy of Casey Laudadio.

By Paige Mathieu

On Thursday, February 9th, despite the weather that caused the first snow day of the season, the committed members of Model UN still traveled to John Hopkins University for a Model UN conference. At the conference, everyone was assigned a country that they had to defend in different situations. Some of the main categories were the Historical World Health Organization, UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, and the Senate Committee on US Recession.  These categories included topics such as militarization, subjection, land seizure in Myanmar, improving health of aboriginal Australians, and how to prevent epidemics.  

 

At the John Hopkins University Model UN Conference, the delegates proved their cases by speaking in small groups during unmoderated caucuses. They would then speak in front of the whole group during moderated caucuses. Delegates who are involved and sponsor resolutions decide who wins the caucuses. The best way to win according to Andrew Fletcher, a senior and member of Model UN for three years, is to have command over the room, be comprehensive, and have the correct resolutions. Helen Rapp, a sophomore and a member of Model UN for two years, added that it is also important to sound intelligent and well-researched.

 

Students who participated in this year’s John Hopkins Model UN Conference said that they enjoyed the experience.  Andrew Fletcher stated that “my final JHUMUNC (John Hopkins University Model UN Conference) …. will remain a memorable and unique experience that I will cherish forever.”  Helen Rapp responded similarly stating that “Model UN is always fun …”, and that  “… the people you meet there are wonderful.” Ben Wiener, a senior, received an honorable mention at the conference.

 

Both of the students interviewed felt that Model UN is a unique experience, and anyone who enjoys world politics or international crisis should join the club. It is a way for students to be creative, learn, and work on teamwork skills.  

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s